ABOUT THE MUSICAL

Les Misérables is a sung-through musical based on the 1862 novel of the same name by French poet and novelist Victor Hugo

One of the world’s most iconic and longest-running musicals, Les Misérables tells the story of Jean Valjean, a former convict who spends a lifetime seeking redemption. Set against the backdrop of 19th-century France and the aftermath of the French Revolution, this timeless story of intertwined destinies reveals the power of compassion and the quiet evil of indifference to human suffering. As Valjean’s quest for a new life carries him into Paris and to the barricades of the Student Revolution, he is hunted by Inspector Javert and the ghosts of his past. Amidst a battle for the soul of Paris, he discovers the true meaning of love and salvation. Performed in over 40 countries and 22 languages, and with a lush, swelling score that features such famed songs as “I Dreamed a Dream,” “On My Own,” and “Bring Him Home,” Les Mis brings Victor Hugo’s revolutionary novel blazingly to life.


 

CHARACTER BREAKDOWNS:

There are no dancing roles in Les Mis.  There are heavy singing roles, as well as roles that require no singing. 

MALE CHARACTERS (STRONG VOCALISTS):

Jean Valjean

Jean Valjean is the hero of the show. It is his life journey that we follow. Jean Valjean is supposed to be stronger than other men, and so he should physically appear bigger than the other males. He should carry himself confidently onstage and come across to the audience as reasaonably mature and paternal. Valjean’s capacity for change is his greatest asset throughout the story. The key to his character is his great humanity and compassion.

The role of Jean Valjean is extremely vocally demanding, but also requires an incredible actor to fill the part. 

Vocal range top: A4

Vocal range bottom: G#2

Javert

Javert is the inspector who serves as antagonist to Jean Valjean. Javert is unswerving in his belief that men cannot change for the better. "Once a thief, always a thief" is his mantra. At first glance, Javert might appear to be the villain of the story, but upon closer examination, it is clear that he is not an evil man. He is a dedicated policeman with a profoundly strong sense of duty. Unlike Valjean, Javert's attitudes are rigid and unmovable. He is stern, forbidding, and lacking in compassion.

Javert should be a talented actor who can convincingly stand up to Jean Valjean. Javert should have a rich baritone voice and be a good singer.

Vocal range top: F#4

Vocal range bottom: F2

Marius

Marius is a young man, the romantic hero of the story. He is impulsive, passionate, willful, and headstrong. His moods change according to his circumstances. He is sweet and tender but also capable of great courage and compassion. In Act I, Marius plays Romeo to Cosette’s Juliet. Marius matures after “The Café Song” as a result of his experiences on the barricade.

Marius should have a lovely, lyrical voice with a contemporary edge.

Vocal range top: Ab4

Vocal range bottom: A2

Thénardier

Thénardier is the true villain of Les Mis. He is the embodiment of evil. That said, he should also possess a wicked sense of humor. He delights in cheating, robbing, defrauding, and blackmailing, and relishes every aspect of his schemes with glee. He is tough, greedy, brutal, lowbrow, crafty and yet irresistible. He hates society and blames it and everyone else for all his misfortune. Thénardier is also the opportunist and realist of the show. He is a thief, a liar, a cheat, and steals valuables from the dead with no remorse. He is also the comic relief of the production. However, his comedy is based in reality and shouldn’t be too exaggerated. He is married to Madame Thénardier and is father to Eponine and Gavroche (although he abandoned Gavroche to the streets of Paris).

Requires an excellent comedic actor who con portray a nasty edge. Vocally, the role is not incredibly demanding; actually, a character voice is best.

Vocal range top: G4

Vocal range bottom: C2

Enjolras

Enjolras is the student leader. He is handsome, brave, and daring, although youthful. He combines his revolutionary ideals with strong, charismatic leadership. Victor Hugo described him as “a thinker and a man of action.” Enjolras must inspire the students to fight and, ultimately, to die for their beliefs. His death at the barricade is one of the dramatic highlights of the show. On the barricade, he should dominate everyone else physically and vocally.

Enjolras is one of the more difficult roles to cast. He should be a natural leader oozing with charisma and have a very strong high baritone or a tenor voice. The original Enjolras won a Tony Award for his performance. Casting a true leader in this role is one way to ensure the character is believable. 

Vocal range top: G4

Vocal range bottom: A2

Gavroche

Gavroche is Thénardier’s son. He is left to fend for himself and lives by his wits in the streets of Paris. His archenemy is Javert, the policeman. Gavroche is brave, witty, and arrogant, with a fantastic, unchanged voice. For comparison, think of a Oliver Twist.

Gavroche is best played by a smaller member of the cast. Gavroche has a very dramatic death at the barricade - he must be a good enough actor to believably die onstage.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: G5

Vocal range bottom: B3

Combeferre, Feuilly, Courfeyrac, Joly, Prouvaire, Lesgles, and Grantaire

(MEMBERS of the ABC society)

These characters compose a secret society of students and workers. The letters A, B, and C, as pronounced in French, make the word “abaisse,” which means “the underdog” or “the people below.” The members are drawn from wealthy families and have chosen to fight for freedom, in stark contrast to the poor who have no choice due to their downtrodden circumstance. Additional characters in the ABC Society, besides Enjolra, Marius, and Grantaire include the following:

Combeferre: the philosopher and believer in peace. He is gentle, humane, strong, and brave.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: D4

Vocal range bottom: E3

Feuilly: a worker who is a self-educated orphan. He is an affectionate, warm, and poetic believer in "nationality."

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: D4

Vocal range bottom: D3

Courfeyrac: a youthful, passionate, and fearless student.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: Eb4

Vocal range bottom: E3

Joly: an eccentric and light-hearted (though sometimes morbid) medical student. His name is derived from the English word “jolly.”

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: G4

Vocal range bottom: D3

Prouvaire: a kind, soft-spoken, and, at the right moments, strong and masterful poet and student of social studies.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: Eb4

Vocal range bottom: D3

Lesgles: a cheerful, laughing-at-life (but unlucky) student. He is a close friend of Joly.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: G4

Vocal range bottom: B3

Bishop Of Digne

The Bishop is a good man who saves Valjean’s soul through showing compassion. Don’t overlook the importance of this role. The Bishop of Digne’s kindness carefully establishes the premise of the show by literally buying Jean Valjean’s soul for God.

This powerful role requires a nice baritone voice and a good actor.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: E4

Vocal range bottom: A2

Farmer

The Farmer has solo lines that are a bit difficult to sing.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: Db4

Vocal range bottom: C3

Laborer

Only one of the Laborers has a solo line. This particular solo line is a bit difficult to sing. 

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: D4

Vocal range bottom: A#2

Chain Gang

The Chain Gang consists of Jean Valjean’s fellow prisoners. There are five soloists (Convicts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5).

The overall vocal range of the Convicts is low, and they should be able sing in a rich baritone range if possible.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: Eb4

Vocal range bottom: F2

OTHER MALE CHARACTERS:

Grantaire

Also a member of the ABC society.

Grantaire is the opposite of Enjolras. He believes in nothing. Although he admires Enjolras, he loves to mock him. Witty and drunken, Grantaire is happy being with the group, and they put up with him because of his good humor. He also keeps a watchful eye on Gavroche, the mascot of the group, and is the most heartbroken when Gavroche is killed. He is so devastated by Gavroche’s death that Grantaire abandons his cynicism and rushes to die on the barricade.

Gender: Male

Bamatabois

Bamatabois is the customer who taunts Fantine into violence. He is a wealthy, dissolute young man who thinks of himself as a gentleman, even dressing in expensive clothes. He is drunk and in a sadistic mood. He chauvinistically feels it is his right to buy anything, even Fantine.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: D5

Vocal range bottom: D3

Foreman

The Foreman begins Fantine on her desperate, downward spiral. He should be virile, commanding, and a bit sleazy around the edges.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: D4

Vocal range bottom: D3

Pimp

The Pimp controls the prostitutes at the docks. He is mean, aggressive, and abusive. The Pimp has a small solo line in “The Docks.”

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: C4

Vocal range bottom: Eb3

Constables

There are two solo Constables (Constables 1 and 2) in the show. 

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: E4

Vocal range bottom: E3

Fauchelevant

Fauchelevant is the victim of the cart crash. The role only requires a few solo lines and some painful yelps.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: Eb4

Vocal range bottom: B3

Sailors (Sailors 1, 2, 3)

Three sailors begin the docks scene. All three have solos but do not need to be great singers.

Gender: Male

Vocal range top: Db4

Vocal range bottom: Eb3

Judge(s)

They appear once in a courtroom to preside over a trial against Jean Valjean.

The Judge or Judges are non-singing roles.

Gender: Male

Major Domo

Major Domo is a great role for a young person with little performing experience. The role ony requires one spoken line. He does not have a solo singing line.

Gender: Male

Army Officer

The barricade scene needs and actor to play the Army Officer.

This actor needs to be heard from offstage; as he’s never seen onstage, this is an easy role to double cast.

Gender: Male

FEMALE CHARACTERS (STRONG VOCALIST):

Eponine

Eponine is the Thénardiers’ daughter. Living hand to mouth, she survives by helping her father in his life of crime. She is a young girl who is streetwise and tough but also sensitive and lonely. This tragic character is hopelessly in love with Marius, knowing that he will never love her. She bravely follows Marius to the barricades in the hope that they will die there together.

She sings one of the most famous numbers in the show, “On My Own,” and should be an excellent actress and singer with a contemporary edge to her voice.

Gender: Female

Vocal range top: E5

Vocal range bottom: F3

 

Fantine

Fantine is the beautiful, young girl who, abandoned by her lover, is left to fend for herself and her daughter, Cosette. She is rejected by society and forced through circumstances to sell herself. She is a brave woman defeated by life who clings to her dignity and is sustained by her love for her daughter, sacrificing everything for the young Cosette. The audience witnesses her descent through a series of terrible events leading to poverty, hunger, cold, loneliness, destitution, and death from consumption.

Requires a performer with a powerful voice that is more mezzo (or alto) than soprano.

Gender: Female

Vocal range top: Eb5

Vocal range bottom: F3

Cosette

Cosette is Fantine’s strong-willed, loving daughter. She is an intelligent, inquiring, personable girl; she is not in any sense a sappy, romantic heroine. Once she is adopted by Jean Valjean, Cosette lives a comfortable, if secluded, life. She falls instantly in love with Marius, changing her world and her priorities.

The role calls for an excellent singer with a lovely, lyrical soprano voice.

Gender: Female

Vocal range top: C6

Vocal range bottom: Bb3

Young Cosette

Young Cosette is Fantine’s daughter and the Thénardiers’ ward. She has been forced into child labor. She is underfed, beaten by Madame Thénardier, and bullied by Eponine. She is properly pathetic and warms the audience’s hearts, making them sympathetic to her plight.

It is essential that Young Cosette be as physically small as possible, especially against Jean Valjean and the Thénardiers.  Young Cosette sings “Castle On A Cloud,” so she must have a nice voice and tap into the emotion in the song.

Gender: Female

Vocal range top: C5

Vocal range bottom: A3

Madame Thénardier

Wife of Thénardier. Together, Madame Thénardier and Thénardier con the world as partners in crime. They were made for each other, and although she complains about him, she loves him dearly. She is coarse and vulgar, unhappy in her existence without knowing why. She is romantic, greedy, manipulative, evil, and larger than life. She is mean and nasty to Little Cosette.

Need an actress with excellent physical comedy skills who is also a good musician with a good sense of rhythm. Able to improvise in nearly any situation.

Gender: Female

Vocal range top: D5

Vocal range bottom: G#3

Girl 5 (Factory Girl)

Girl 5 (Factory Girl) is the shop girl who fights with Fantine. She is mean, spiteful, and selfish. She also is most likely having an affair with the Foreman and is jealous of his affection for Fantine.

Often, Girl 5 will serve as Fantine’s understudy or as a Fantine double.

Gender: Female

Vocal range top: Eb5

Vocal range bottom: F4

Old Woman

The Old Woman is a nice featured role who purchases Fantine’s hair.

Her vocal solo is a bit tricky, requiring a strong singer if possible.

Gender: Female

Vocal range top: D5

Vocal range bottom: E4

OTHER FEMALE CHARACTERS:

Factory Workers

The Factory Workers include the following characters with solo lines: Workers 1 and 2, Woman, Factory Girls 1, 2, 3, and 4.

Gender: Female

Vocal range top: C5

Vocal range bottom: E4

Working Girls

The Docks are a depressing and dangerous place to be, occupied by working girls and their customers. Working Girl 1, 2, 3, and Sick Working Girl have solo lines.

Gender: Female

Vocal range top: Db5

Vocal range bottom: C4

Young Eponine

Young Eponine is the pampered daughter of the Thénardiers. She does little except taunt Young Cosette. The role requires no singing or speaking.

She should be a smaller version of grown Eponine and resemble Eponine in appearance and features.

Gender: Female

Women

There are also four soloists for working-class Women in Scene 6 (Women 1, 2, 3, and 4) who sing about the events at the barricade.

Gender: Female

Vocal range top: Db5

Vocal range bottom: Eb4

Nuns

The two Nuns serve to take care of Fantine in her sickness. They are non-singing and non-speaking roles.

Gender: Female

CHARACTERS OF BOTH GENDERS:

Montparnasse, Babet, Brujon and Claquesous

Members of Thénardier’s gang of thieves. Men played these roles on Broadway, but for the School Edition, you may cast them as a mix of males and females.

Claquesous is tough, dangerous, and secretive.

Gender: Both

Vocal range top: E4

Vocal range bottom: C4

Brujon is physically very strong. He has the body of a bear and a pea-sized brain. A genuine gangster, he is stupid and evil.

Gender: Both

Vocal range top: C#4

Vocal range bottom: B3

Babet is physically frail but lean and cunning.

Gender: Both

Vocal range top: E4

Vocal range bottom: E3

Montparnasse is a teenager who is handsome and dangerous (he kills with a knife). He is well dressed, strongly built, and agile.

Gender: Both

Vocal range top: C#4

Vocal range bottom: C#3

Gavroche's Gang

This may be an opportunity for younger children to be involved in the show. We may add a gang of kids to follow Gavroche around. Paris at this time would be full of orphans (due to years of wars and revolutions), and representing these young people onstage is a nice addition. One member of Gavroche’s Gang could have a solo line if cast as Solo Urchin.

Gender: Both

Vocal range top: G4

Vocal range bottom: C4

Onlookers and Bystanders

These characters make up the crowd of people onstage that witness the cart crash. Onlookers 1, 2, 3, and 4 have solo lines.

Gender: Both

Vocal range top: C5

Vocal range bottom: G4

Revolutionaries

An ensemble of Revolutionaries at the barricade scenes. 

Gender: Both

Sentries

In addition to the ensemble of Revolutionaries, the barricade scenes need actors to serve as Sentries 1 and 2. 

Gender: Both

Wedding Guests

Wedding Guests form a chorus that celebrates the wedding of Marius and Cosette. They do not have any solo singing lines.

Gender: Both

Mistaken Jean Valjean And Family

These characters are also non-singing. Mistaken Jean Valjean is the man who Javert believes to be Jean Valjean.

Gender: Both

ADDITIONAL FACTS

MUSICAL NUMBERS

JEAN VALJEAN

"Prologue: Work Song" 

"Prologue: On Parole"

"Prologue: Valjean Arrested, Valjean Forgiven"

"Prologue: What Have I Done?"

"Fantine's Arrest"

'The Runaway Cart"

"Who Am I? / The Trial"

"Fantine's Death: Come to Me"

"The Confrontation"

"The Well Scene"

"The Bargain / The Thénardier Waltz of Treachery"

"The Robbery"

"Rue Plumet – In My Life"

"The Attack on the Rue Plumet"

"One Day More"

"The First Attack"

"Bring Him Home"

"Every Day"

"Valjean's Confession"

"Valjean's Death"

MARIUS 

"Look Down"

"The Robbery"

"Éponine's Errand"

"ABC Café / Red and Black"

"Rue Plumet – In My Life"

"A Heart Full of Love"

"The Attack on the Rue Plumet"

"One Day More"

"Building the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"At the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"A Little Fall of Rain" (Éponine's Death)

"Drink with Me"

"The Second Attack (Death of Gavroche)"

"Empty Chairs at Empty Tables"

"Every Day"

"Valjean's Confession"

"Wedding Chorale"/ Beggars at the Feast 

"Valjean's Death"

JAVERT 

"Prologue: Work Song" 

"Fantine's Arrest"

'The Runaway Cart"

"The Confrontation"

"Javert's Intervention"

"Stars"

"One Day More"

"Building the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"Javert's Arrival"

"The First Attack"

"Soliloquy (Javert's Suicide)"

ENJOLRAS 

"Look Down"

"ABC Café / Red and Black"

"Do You Hear the People Sing?"

"One Day More"

"Building the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"At the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"Javert's Arrival"

"Night of Anguish"

"The First Attack"

"Dawn of Anguish"

"The Second Attack (Death of Gavroche)"

"The Final Battle"

EPONINE

"The Robbery"

"Éponine's Errand"

"Rue Plumet – In My Life"

"A Heart Full of Love"

"The Attack on the Rue Plumet"

"One Day More"

"Building the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"On My Own"

"A Little Fall of Rain" (Éponine's Death)

"Valjean's Death"

THENARDIER

"Master of the House"

"The Bargain / The Thénardier Waltz of Treachery"

"The Robbery"

"Javert's Intervention"

"The Attack on the Rue Plumet"

"One Day More"

"Dog Eats Dog (The Sewers)"

"Wedding Chorale"/ Beggars at the Feast -

 

MDME THENARDIER

"Master of the House"

"The Bargain / The Thénardier Waltz of Treachery"

"The Robbery"

"One Day More"

"Wedding Chorale"/ Beggars at the Feast 

FANTINE 

"At the End of the Day"

"I Dreamed a Dream"

"Lovely Ladies"

"Fantine's Arrest"

"Fantine's Death: Come to Me"

"Valjean's Death"

COSETTE

"Rue Plumet – In My Life"

"A Heart Full of Love"

"The Attack on the Rue Plumet"

"One Day More"

"Every Day"

"Wedding Chorale"/ Beggars at the Feast 

"Valjean's Death"

YOUNG COSETTE 

"The Well Scene"

"Castle on a Cloud"

GAVROCHE 

"Look Down"

"ABC Café / Red and Black"

"Little People"

"The Second Attack (Death of Gavroche)"

FEUILLY 

"ABC Café / Red and Black"

"Do You Hear the People Sing?"

"At the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"Drink with Me"

GRANTAIRE 

"ABC Café / Red and Black"

"Building the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"At the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"Drink with Me"

COMBEFERRE 

"ABC Café / Red and Black"

"Do You Hear the People Sing?"

"At the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

COURFEYAC 

"ABC Café / Red and Black"

"Do You Hear the People Sing?"

"At the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

PROUVAIRE 

"ABC Café / Red and Black"

"Building the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"Drink with Me"

LEGSLES

"ABC Café / Red and Black"

"Building the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

JOLY 

"ABC Café / Red and Black"

"Drink with Me"

BISHOP OF DIGNE

"Prologue: On Parole"

"Prologue: Valjean Arrested, Valjean Forgiven"

OLD WOMAN 

"Lovely Ladies"

"Look Down"

ARMY OFFICER
"At the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"The Final Battle"

FARMER 

"Prologue: On Parole"

LABOURER 

"Prologue: On Parole"

INNKEEPERS WIFE 

"Prologue: On Parole"

CONSTABLES

"Prologue: Valjean Arrested, Valjean Forgiven"

FOREMAN 

"At the End of the Day"

CHAIN GANG

"Prologue: Work Song" 

FACTORY GIRL 

"At the End of the Day"

FACTORY WORKERS

"At the End of the Day"

SAILORS 

"Lovely Ladies"

WORKING WOMEN 

"Lovely Ladies"

WORKING GIRL 

"Look Down"

CRONE 

"Lovely Ladies"

PIMP 

"Lovely Ladies"

"Look Down"

BAMATABOIS

"Fantine's Arrest"

FAUCHEVELANT 

'The Runaway Cart"

ONLOOKERS

'The Runaway Cart"

BRUJON 

"The Attack on the Rue Plumet"

BABET 

"The Attack on the Rue Plumet"

CLAQUESOUS 

"The Attack on the Rue Plumet"

MONTPARNASSE

"The Attack on the Rue Plumet"

WOMEN OF PARIS 
"Turning"

STUDENTS 

"At the Barricade (Upon These Stones)"

"Night of Anguish"

"The First Attack"

"The Second Attack (Death of Gavroche)"

COMPANY 

"At the End of the Day"

"Master of the House"

"Look Down"

"Do You Hear the People Sing?"

"One Day More"

"Drink with Me"

"The Final Battle"

"Wedding Chorale"/ Beggars at the Feast 

"Do You Hear The People Sing? (Reprise) / [Finale]"

SHOW HISTORY

 

Productions

Inception 

A two-hour demo tape with French composer Claude-Michel Schönberg accompanying himself on the piano and singing every role was recorded. Later, an album of this collaboration was recorded at CTS Studios in Wembley and was released in 1980, selling 260,000 copies.

That year, in September 1980, a stage version directed by veteran French film director Robert Hossein was produced at the Palais des Sports in Paris. The show was a success, with 100 performances seen by over 500,000 people.

West End 

The first production in English opened on 8 October 1985 (five years after the original production) at the Barbican Arts Centre, London and played to preview performances beginning on 28 September 1985. The show transferred to the Palace Theatre, London and moved again in 2004, to the smaller Queen's Theatre, where it is still playing. It celebrated its ten-thousandth performance in 2010. In 2015, the West End production celebrated its 30th anniversary. The co-production has generated valuable income for the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Broadway

The musical premiered on Broadway in 1987 at The Broadway Theatre. The $4.5 million production had a more than $4 million advance sale prior to its New York opening. The original Broadway cast included Colm Wilkinson as Jean Valjean, David Bryant as Marius, Judy Kuhn as Cosette, Michael Maguire as Enjolras, Frances Ruffelle as Éponine, Braden Danner as Gavroche, Donna Vivino as Young Cosette, Jennifer Butt as Madame Thénardier, Leo Burmester as Thénardier, Randy Graff as Fantine, Terrence Mann as Javert, and Chrissie McDonald as Young Éponine. 

The musical ran at the Broadway Theatre through 1990, when it moved to the Imperial Theatre. It was scheduled to close in 2003, but the closing was postponed by a surge in public interest.

After 6,680 performances in sixteen years, when it closed in 2003, it was the second-longest-running Broadway musical after Cats. It was surpassed by The Phantom of the Opera in 2006.

2006 Broadway revival

Only three years after the original run closed, Les Misérables began a return to Broadway in 2006 at the Broadhurst Theatre for a limited run that was subsequently made open-ended.​ The revival closed on 6 January 2008. 

2014 Broadway revival

The show returned to Broadway in March 2014 at the Imperial Theatre. The production closed on 4 September 2016, after 1,026 performances over two-and-a-half years. The revival recouped its entire initial investment and grossed $109 million.

The 2014 Broadway revival was nominated for 3 Tony Awards: Best Revival of a MusicalBest Leading Actor in a Musical, and Best Sound Design.

Les Mis SCHOOL EDITION

The school edition cuts a considerable amount of material from the original show. It is divided into thirty scenes and, although no critical scenes or songs have been removed, it runs 25–30 minutes shorter than the official version. A few subtle changes of vocal pitch have been made: "What Have I Done?", Valjean's Soliloquy, "Stars" by Javert, "A Little Fall of Rain" by Éponine and Marius, "Turning", and "Castle on a Cloud" lose a verse each. During "Fantine's Arrest" Bamatabois loses two verses. The song "Fantine's Death/Confrontation" is edited, and the counterpoint duel between Javert and Valjean is lost, as well as a verse by Fantine. "Dog Eats Dog" by Thénardier is heavily truncated. "Beggars at the Feast", is shortened, with Thénardier losing a verse, and the song before it, "Wedding Chorale", is excluded entirely although the rest of the wedding remains in place. Also, the drinker's introduction to "Master of the House" is cut completely.

Trivia

  • There are approximately 101 cast and crew directly involved in every performance.

  • Each performance requires 392 complete costumes - and 31 wigs.

  • There have been almost 40 cast recordings of Les Miserables.

  • On 22 January 2010, the show celebrated its 10,000th performance in London.

  • The production has played over 45,000 professional performances worldwide to a total audience of more than 57 million people - that's almost the population of Italy.

  • Contrary to popular opinion, the musical is NOT set during the French Revolution of 1789. The action begins in 1815, and follows events over the next two decades including the Paris Uprising of 1832.

  • The Les Miserables schools edition was launched in the US in 2001 and in the UK in 2002.

  • In school productions, the entire cast must be 19 years of age or under, and must be amateurs.

  • Les Miserables celebrated its 10th anniversary with a gala concert at the Royal Albert Hall, London. The concert starred the original Jean Valjean, Colm Wilkinson. The finale featured 17 different Jean Valjeans from around the world singing in different languages.

 

Other Resources

 

We highly recommend that you watch an entire stage production and familiarize yourself with the Broadway soundtrack. 

© 2017 by Academy for Children's Theatre
 

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